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Winter College

Breakout Sessions

Beth Cate
Clinical Associate Professor, IU School of Public and Environmental Affairs
The Once and Future Supreme Court

In February, will the Supreme Court have nine justices or eight? Who cares and does it matter? After all, the original Supreme Court had six members, and some commentators and politicians are now suggesting that Congress freeze and ultimately shrink the court, in order to reduce its overall influence in American law and public policy. Others call such proposals last-ditch political efforts to avoid a rollback of conservative gains on the court. The current debate over the handling of the court—by politicians and the court itself—after Justice Scalia’s death raises stark questions about the role the court plays in shaping American society, how and why that has changed over time, and who will chart its course going forward. This session will be a lively discussion of what the Supreme Court means to America and the people and issues involved in determining its power and significance.

Fred H. Cate
Vice President for Research; Senior Fellow for the Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research; and Director for the Center for Law, Ethics, and Applied Research in Health Information; Indiana University
Distinguished Professor and C. Ben Dutton Professor of Law, IU Maurer School of Law
Grand Challenges

Last year Indiana University embarked on a five-year initiative to invest $300 million and 175 new faculty positions, the largest academic investment in IU’s nearly 200-year history, in tackling up to five “Grand Challenges”—pressing issues facing society that IU is uniquely positioned to address. The program focuses on investments that are, in the words of President Michael A. McRobbie, “few, large, focused, and measured by their impact”—impact on individuals, communities, the economy, and society. Learn more about IU’s Grand Challenges program; the first investment, announced in June, in “Precision Health”; and this bold new commitment to enhancing the quality of life in Indiana and beyond.

Amy S. Chappell
Retired Clinical Research Physician, Eli Lilly and Company
Lessons from The Blue Zones: Implemented Through Lifestyle Medicine

This session will discuss ways that lifestyle medicine can put us on the path to better health and, in doing so, reduce the rising cost of health care in the U.S. and around the world. With chronic diseases accounting for such a large portion of the utilization of health care resources and cost, what better way to begin curbing the health care crisis than to address the underlying causes of chronic diseases? There is ample evidence that by changing one’s lifestyle choices not only can chronic diseases be effectively treated, but they can also be prevented and even reversed by proper education and making healthier choices. The use of evidence-based information and best practices and lifestyle interventions may be a more cost-effective way to utilize prevention than current treatment regimens of drugs. Such is the philosophy and approach taken by the Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP), which is a scientifically validated, evidence-based disease prevention and community-based approach to the treatment of chronic diseases. In 2005, Dan Buettner published a landmark article identifying pockets of longevity around the world. He found commonalties in these geographically diverse areas that may contain clues to living longer, better.

Amanda Friesen
Assistant Professor of Political Science, IUPUI School of Liberal Arts
Faculty Research Fellow, IUPUI Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture
Baskets of Deplorables and Bad Hombres: Rhetoric and Ideology in the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election

The 2016 U.S. presidential election featured two candidates who have been household names for decades—one for a lifetime/career in public service and politics and the other an entertainment and real estate mogul who had not previously held public office. The general election followed an intense primary season for both political parties and the eventual nomination of the first woman to represent a major U.S. party for the presidency and an individual not universally supported by his party—both with some of the lowest approval ratings in recent history. This session will highlight how political science research can help us understand this extremely divisive and unusual election.

Ka He
Professor and Chairman, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, IU School of Public Health–Bloomington
Lessons from The Blue Zones: Implemented Through Lifestyle Medicine

This session will discuss ways that lifestyle medicine can put us on the path to better health and, in doing so, reduce the rising cost of health care in the U.S. and around the world. With chronic diseases accounting for such a large portion of the utilization of health care resources and cost, what better way to begin curbing the health care crisis than to address the underlying causes of chronic diseases? There is ample evidence that by changing one’s lifestyle choices not only can chronic diseases be effectively treated, but they can also be prevented and even reversed by proper education and making healthier choices. The use of evidence-based information and best practices and lifestyle interventions may be a more cost-effective way to utilize prevention than current treatment regimens of drugs. Such is the philosophy and approach taken by the Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP), which is a scientifically validated, evidence-based disease prevention and community-based approach to the treatment of chronic diseases. In 2005, Dan Buettner published a landmark article identifying pockets of longevity around the world. He found commonalties in these geographically diverse areas that may contain clues to living longer, better.

Feisal Amin Rasoul al-Istrabadi
Founding Director, Center for the Study of the Middle East and Professor of Practice, IU School of Global and International Studies
Associate Director, IU Center for Constitutional Democracy
Change and Turmoil in the Middle East and the Challenging Issues Likely to Confront the Incoming Trump Administration

Rarely has the Middle East been in such turmoil and convulsive change as it has in the past several years. Ambassador Feisal al-Istrabadi will outline some of the pressing and challenging issues that are likely to confront the incoming administration. These issues include the convulsive wars in Syria and Yemen, the continued threat ISIL poses, the Iranian nuclear deal and its aftermath, and the changes now underway in Turkey.

Michael Koryta
New York Times-bestselling author
A Discussion on Storytelling, Suspense, and Narrative Structure

Award-winning writer Michael Koryta will discuss the importance of suspense in all narratives and storytelling mediums, and how fundamental storytelling skills and an understanding of narrative structure can benefit all forms of messaging, from the entertainment industry to corporate boardrooms. He will draw upon his career expertise as a journalist, private investigator, and novelist, as well as his experiences from the IU College of Arts and Sciences and its criminal justice department.

James H. Madison
Thomas and Kathryn Miller Professor Emeritus of History, IU College of Arts and Sciences
Two Hundred Plus Years of Indiana History

While looking back on Indiana’s bicentennial, Jim Madison will present some of the best stories of our past—from Hoosier pioneers, through the Civil War, to the 21st century. His illustrated talk will highlight connections between past and present and help us think about our future—for Hoosiers and all Americans.

Debra Mesch
Director of the Women’s Philanthropy Institute, IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy
Women: From Passenger to Driver of Philanthropy

Women are driving philanthropy in unprecedented ways, given their $5.15 trillion in assets, and the equal or higher amount they are inheriting due to the intergenerational transfer of wealth. In most houses, women make or influence philanthropic decisions and are often the transmitters of philanthropic values to the next generations. Consumer companies market products towards women—they recognize that women control the majority of wealth in this country and are the household’s chief financial officers. Gender matters in philanthropy, perhaps now more than ever. This session will explore the changing philanthropic landscape, and what research says about gender differences in philanthropy.

Erin Colone Peabody
Clinical Assistant Professor of Speech and Hearing Sciences, IU College of Arts and Sciences
“You Don’t Understand What I’m Telling You!”: How Speech Language Pathologists Give a Voice to Those Who Are Unable to Effectively Communicate with Others

The role of speech language pathologists is to evaluate and treat communication disorders. Those who are unable to effectively communicate have challenges getting basic wants and needs met, developing relationships with others, and even establishing their independence. This session will look at a variety of diagnoses, such as autism, motor speech disorders, aphasia, Down syndrome, and cerebral palsy, and discuss how SLPs help to address the challenges these individuals face as they attempt to communicate with others.

Mattie White
Associate Athletic Director for Academic Services and the Excellence Academy and Senior Woman Administrator, IU Department of Intercollegiate Athletics
Embodying the Spirit: Impacting Lives and Changing the World

Students participating in intercollegiate athletics at the Division-I level have long been a topic of national conversation. The dialogue tends to focus on the myths, stereotypes, and challenges faced by these students. However, most student-athletes tend to excel both academically and athletically during their time on campuses around the country. We invite you to take an inside look at the student-athlete experience on our campus and learn more about how our students embody the spirit of IU.

Gregory R. Witkowski
Associate Professor of Philanthropic Studies and Director of Graduate Programs, IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy
Hoosier Philanthropy: Using the Past to Inform the Future

Philanthropic innovation has a long tradition in Indiana that has continued through today. At the vanguard of philanthropic experimentation in the Progressive Era, Indiana supported the greatest number of Carnegie libraries in the United States, engaging communities to build and maintain these educational institutions that, in many cases, remain key libraries throughout the state. In the capital of Indianapolis, one of the first Charity Organization Society chapters in the United States formed in 1879. The Charity Organization Society dedicated itself to fighting poverty by sending volunteers into households, a practice that some view as predating social workers of today. Arguably Indiana’s most important philanthropic institution, the Lilly Endowment Inc., was formed in 1937 with money from the Lilly family. The Lilly Endowment supported the development of a vibrant nonprofit sector as well, making this combination of major gifts and grassroots philanthropy a notable trait of Indiana. This session indicates innovative approaches taken to philanthropic engagement in the past, before discussing recent trends and approaches to charitable giving.